Friday, January 9, 2009

BOOKS YOU LOVE, HAVE THEY CHANGED?

As a child I loved to read about animals (Bambi, White Fang, My Friend Flicka), and mysteries (The Bobbsey Twins, Nancy Drew). I also loved to read about real people (Little House on the Prairie books). I even read Tom Sawyer. I find my taste in books hasn't changed much. I read books for adults of course, but I still love cozy mysteries, autobiographies, and sometimes, books about animals. I even read the Harry Potter books.....all of them.

Mary Jean Kelso wrote:

I don't remember having favorites until I was probably in fourth or fifth grade. Then, Nancy Drew became collectible to me. I still have some of the original books. Not many as I didn't have much disposable money. However, I thought so highly of them I shellacked the bindings of some.

You can see the influence in my Goodbye Is Forever YA mystery novel.

My latest Children's PB was One Family's Christmas but the 3rd Andy book is due to release this winter. Andy and Spirit in the Big Rescue. http://www.amazon.com/Familys-Christmas-Mary-Jean-Kelso/dp/1935137050/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1231525191&sr=1-1

Ronica Stromberg, Author of The Time-for-bed Angel wrote:

My favorite book as a child was The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, followed by The Borrowers. These were pre-Harry Potter days, and there didn't seem to be much fantasy . . . or maybe I just wasn't able to find it as a child.

The Time-for-bed Angel follows the adventures of a guardian angel of a rambunctious little boy who refuses to go to bed. The story can be comforting and reassuring for small children that they are loved and watched over at all times--even in the dark.
http://www.amazon.com/Time-Bed-Angel-Ronica-Stromberg/dp/0825478154/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1231520358&sr=1-1

I'm hoping Ronica will tell me what she enjoys reading today. When I hear from her I will add it to this post.

In the meantime....What did you like to read as a child? Have your tastes changed?

7 comments:

Katie Hines said...

I read a lot of Nancy Drew, Lloyd Alexander's fantasy series, C.S. Lewis, and, of course, Walter Farley's wonderful horse stories. I also read about swashbuckler's on the high seas, "Half Magic" (several times), "Island of the Blue Dolphin" (loved it), and so on.

I find that I still read plenty of fantasy, and read lots of bestsellers.

Christina E. Rodriguez said...

I read more non-fiction now that I ever did in the past. My reading habits tend to run in phases, I guess. As a kid I loved fantasy novels until I hit my sci-fi and horror phase as a pre-teen.

Joy said...

I don't think my tastes in books has changed all that much. I still like to read YA and midgrade books. The one thing I'd say has changed is that now I read about how to write and market my books.

Joy Delgado
http://www.laughing-zebra-children-books.com
http://goingbeyondreading.blogspot.com/

Ann Parker said...

Bobbsey Twins, absolutely! Then later, there was Edgar Allen Poe, Sherlock Holmes (I wasn't much of a Nancy Drew girl), everything by Madeleine L'Engle ... then Ii into sci-fi/fantasy. I've loved mysteries throughout the years, though.

My comment re: today's books for children (particularly teens): They seem a whole lot darker.

Helen Ginger said...

I read my sister's Bobbsey Twins.

I now read a lot of mystery/suspense. But I also read YA -- Harry Potter, Percy Jackson series, even the Twilight books. And I like "different" books like Geek Love and The Time Traveler's Wife.

http://straightfromhel.blogspot.com

Krista said...

I just love your posts! This one in particular, because I have an entire shelf of Newberry Award winners that I bought from ebay - this year!- and am reading them with as much relish as when I was 12. =)

kriswaldherr said...

Well, my tastes have changed -- I guess that's unavoidable, given that the experiences I've had since I was a child. However, it's a lot of fun to revisit books from childhood and read them with the eyes of an adult.

For example, I'm now rereading Charlotte's Web with my daughter. I never noticed how incredibly dark it is, with such hard won wisdom. The line from chapter three about Wilbur's exchanging an hour of freedom for a bucket of slop is just devastating.